Commentary: On Celebrating 26 Years of the ADA

Today marks the 26th anniversary of the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA. Signed into law on July 26, 1990 by President George H.W. Bush, it forbids discrimination against people with disabilities in public places. This includes restaurants, stores, hotels, transportation and other public places. The commemoration of this anniversary is an opportunity for those of us with disabilities to reflect on how the ADA has helped us, and what still needs to be done. This week, I have compiled my list of top five ways the ADA has helped people with disabilities, and the work that is still left to do to achieve full equality.

  1. Accessible public transportation has made it easier for people with disabilities to travel independently. Audible announcements on buses and trains allow people like me with vision loss to know where we are and when we need to get on or off. Meanwhile, buses and trains equipped with ramps and accessible seating enable those with mobility impairments to use public transportation independently.
  1. Access to public places gives people with disabilities the freedom and independence to go wherever we please. Curb cuts and ramps allow individuals who use wheelchairs to be out and about on the street and enter places like restaurants, stores, school and their workplace. Braille signs on restrooms, elevators and other rooms allow people who are blind to know where we are in a building without needing much, if any, assistance.
  1. The general public is becoming more aware about the capabilities and needs of those of us with disabilities. Prior to the ADA, the lack of access prevented many people with disabilities from going out independently. The accessible environment established after the ADA allows us to be more integrated in our communities, thereby allowing non-disabled people to know us better.
  1. The unemployment rate for people with vision loss has constantly been between 70 and 75percent, and this is also true for people with other disabilities. The ADA prohibits job discrimination, but employers often have unfounded misconceptions about people with disabilities. Although I might be the most qualified candidate for a job, an employer simply might not hire me because I am blind. This is a situation which people with disabilities know all too well. It will take more than a piece of legislation to change these persisting attitudes.
  1. Today’s technologically driven world isn’t always easy for people with disabilities to navigate. ATMs, vending machines and other kiosks found in countless businesses can be difficult, if not impossible, for people with disabilities to use. Not all machines have audio or tactile accessibility features, so I and countless others cannot use them independently. Technology manufacturers can avoid this problem all together by incorporating accessibility into their products from the start.

There’s no doubt that the ADA has been instrumental in providing Americans with Disabilities with more access and countless opportunities. Thanks to this legislation, people like me can go out to events, school and work, just like everyone else. My hat goes off to all the politicians, advocates and persons with disabilities who fought tirelessly for the ADA to become law. There is still much more to do, and we should all continue fighting for a truly accessible and inclusive environment.

How has the ADA benefited you as a person with a disability? Please share your thoughts and experiences with us!

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